yeahwriters
Although many writers had had periods of significant depression, mania, or hypomania, they were consistently appealing, entertaining, and interesting people. They had led interesting lives, and they enjoyed telling me about them as much as I enjoyed hearing about them. Mood disorders tend to be episodic, characterized by relatively brief periods of low or high mood lasting weeks to months, interspersed with long periods of normal mood (known as euthymia to us psychiatrists). All the writers were euthymic at the time that I interviewed them, and so they could look back on their periods of depression or mania with considerable detachment. They were also able to describe how abnormalities in mood state affected their creativity. Consistently, they indicated that they were unable to be creative when either depressed or manic.

The relationship between creativity and mental illness – a fascinating study based on writers from the prestigious Iowa Writers’ Workshop. Kurt Vonnegut was among the subjects. (via explore-blog)

I think about this a lot, as I suffer from panic disorder.

(via yeahwriters)

kazaera

An Elegy for Elenwë

kazaera:

A/N: This will probably make no sense whatsoever if you haven’t seen the convos between me and Lintamande about a Valinorean version of mathematical history. Relevant links include my “elven mathematicians” tag, Lintamande’s "murderous math nerds" tag, and this post in particular. Long story short: our basic premise is that the majority of people doing pure mathematics are Vanyarin women and Elenwë is Fermat.

yeah.

There will be an explanation of the various references to bits of mathematical history near the end. Also, I note this probably qualifies as self-indulgent OC fic: it stars Elenwë’s old teacher Eäla with guest appearance by Elenwë’s sister Sírinzil in Valinor after the Exile, Elenwë herself only appearing in flashbacks.

*****

Read More

survivingrealitywithoutnormality
zimrahin:

Official Chris-Hemsworth-in-Thor-2 Tolkien fancasting verdict:
Hador 

His people were of great strength and stature, ready in mind, bold and steadfast, quick to anger and to laughter, mighty among the Children of Ilúvatar in the youth of Mankind. - The Silmarillion

He’s basically the entire House of Hador personified, so it makes sense for him to be the iconic first Lord of Dor-lómin. 

zimrahin:

Official Chris-Hemsworth-in-Thor-2 Tolkien fancasting verdict:

Hador 

His people were of great strength and stature, ready in mind, bold and steadfast, quick to anger and to laughter, mighty among the Children of Ilúvatar in the youth of Mankind. - The Silmarillion

He’s basically the entire House of Hador personified, so it makes sense for him to be the iconic first Lord of Dor-lómin. 

survivingrealitywithoutnormality

survivingrealitywithoutnormality:

Sometimes I wonder about his family’s response to Aegnor refusing re-embodiment and when they find out.

Does Finrod discover in the Halls of Mandos? Do their souls meet and he has to face his brother asking why Beren & Lúthien and not Andreth & me? Do they not communicate there and he’s…

excerpts-from-tolkien
excerpts-from-tolkien:

'I have not asked for comfort,' said Andreth. 'For what do I need it?'
'For the doom of Men that has touched thee as a woman,' said Finrod. 'Dost thou think that I do not know? Is he not my brother dearly loved? Aegnor: Aikanár, the Sharp-flame, swift and eager. And not long are the years since you first met, and your hands touched in this darkness. Yet then thou wert a maiden, brave and eager, in the morning upon the high hills of Dorthonion.’
'Say on!' said Andreth. 'Say: who art now but a wise-woman, alone, and age that shall not touch him has already set winter's grey in thy hair! But say not thou to me, for so he once did!’
'Alas!' said Finrod. 'That is the bitterness, beloved adaneth, woman of Men, is it not? that has run through all your words. If I could speak any comfort, you would deem it lordly from one on my side of the sundering doom. But what can I say, save to remind you of the Hope that you yourself have revealed?’
'I did not say that it was ever my hope,' answered Andreth. 'And even were it so, I would still cry: why should this hurt come here and now? Why should we love you, and why should ye love us (if ye do), and yet set the gulf between?'
'Because we were made so, close kin,' said Finrod. 'But we did not make ourselves, and therefore we, the Eldar, did not set the gulf. Nay, adaneth, we are not lordly in this, but pitiful. That word will displease thee. Yet pity is of two kinds: one is of kinship recognized, and is near to love; the other is of difference of fortune perceived, and is near to pride. I speak of the former.’
'Speak of neither to me!' said Andreth. 'I desire neither. I was young and I looked on his flame, and now I am old and lost. He was young and his flame leaped towards me, but he turned away, and he is young still. Do candles pity moths?'
'Or moths candles, when the wind blows them out?' said Finrod. 'Adaneth, I tell thee, Aikanár, the Sharp-flame loved thee. For thy sake now he will never take the hand of any bride of his own kindred, but live alone to the end, remembering the morning in the hills of Dorthonion. But too soon in the North-wind his flame will go out! Foresight is given to the Eldar in many things not far off, though seldom of joy, and I say to thee thou shalt live long in the order of your kind, and he will go before thee and he will not wish to return.’
—J.R.R. Tolkien, The History of Middle-earth X: Morgoth’s Ring, Part Four “Athrabeth Finrod Ah Andreth”
Read More

excerpts-from-tolkien:

'I have not asked for comfort,' said Andreth. 'For what do I need it?'

'For the doom of Men that has touched thee as a woman,' said Finrod. 'Dost thou think that I do not know? Is he not my brother dearly loved? Aegnor: Aikanár, the Sharp-flame, swift and eager. And not long are the years since you first met, and your hands touched in this darkness. Yet then thou wert a maiden, brave and eager, in the morning upon the high hills of Dorthonion.’

'Say on!' said Andreth. 'Say: who art now but a wise-woman, alone, and age that shall not touch him has already set winter's grey in thy hair! But say not thou to me, for so he once did!’

'Alas!' said Finrod. 'That is the bitterness, beloved adaneth, woman of Men, is it not? that has run through all your words. If I could speak any comfort, you would deem it lordly from one on my side of the sundering doom. But what can I say, save to remind you of the Hope that you yourself have revealed?’

'I did not say that it was ever my hope,' answered Andreth. 'And even were it so, I would still cry: why should this hurt come here and now? Why should we love you, and why should ye love us (if ye do), and yet set the gulf between?'

'Because we were made so, close kin,' said Finrod. 'But we did not make ourselves, and therefore we, the Eldar, did not set the gulf. Nay, adaneth, we are not lordly in this, but pitiful. That word will displease thee. Yet pity is of two kinds: one is of kinship recognized, and is near to love; the other is of difference of fortune perceived, and is near to pride. I speak of the former.’

'Speak of neither to me!' said Andreth. 'I desire neither. I was young and I looked on his flame, and now I am old and lost. He was young and his flame leaped towards me, but he turned away, and he is young still. Do candles pity moths?'

'Or moths candles, when the wind blows them out?' said Finrod. 'Adaneth, I tell thee, Aikanár, the Sharp-flame loved thee. For thy sake now he will never take the hand of any bride of his own kindred, but live alone to the end, remembering the morning in the hills of Dorthonion. But too soon in the North-wind his flame will go out! Foresight is given to the Eldar in many things not far off, though seldom of joy, and I say to thee thou shalt live long in the order of your kind, and he will go before thee and he will not wish to return.’

—J.R.R. Tolkien, The History of Middle-earth X: Morgoth’s Ring, Part Four “Athrabeth Finrod Ah Andreth”

Read More